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Avatar: The Last Airbender - North and South, Part Two by Gene Luen Yang
Bird & Squirrel On Fire by James Burks
Bird & Squirrel on the Edge! by James Burks
Captain Coconut and the Case of the Missing Bananas by Anushka Ravishankar and Priya Sundram
Dreadnought by April Daniels
Edible Numbers by Jennifer Vogel Bass
Extraordinary by Miriam Spitzer Franklin
Extreme Babymouse by Jennifer L. Holm
Fenway and Hattie and the Evil Bunny Gang by Victoria J. Coe
The 52-Story Treehouse by Andy Griffiths and Terry Denton
Giant Days, Volume 1 by John Allison
The Girl from Everywhere by Heidi Heilig
The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms by N.K. Jemisin
If I Was Your Girl by Meredith Russo
Lily and Dunkin by Donna Gephart
March: Book One by John Lewis, Andrew Aydin and Nate Powell
New Cat by Yangsook Choi
Oh! by Kevin Henkes
Rock with Wings by Anne Hillerman
Roller Girl by Victoria Jamieson
The Thrilling Adventures of Lovelace and Babbage: The (Mostly) True Story of the First Computer by Sydney Padua
Toto Trouble: Back to Crass by Thierry Coppée
Towers Falling by Jewell Parker Rhodes

Miscellaneous
Thanks for the Memoirs

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Rating System

5 stars: Completely enjoyable or compelling
4 stars: Good but flawed
3 stars: Average
2 stars: OK
1 star: Did not finish


March: Book One: 02/15/17

March: Book One by John LewisMarch: Book One by John Lewis, Andrew Aydin and Nate Powell is the start of a trilogy that recounts Senator Lewis's participation in the civil rights movement. Lewis's memoir is framed in the story of him meeting with some attendees to President Obama's second inauguration.

This nonfiction comic covers the early years of the movement, beginning with a Lewis's childhood where he was in charge of the chickens and how he spent his time preaching the gospel to them. His early calling and his aptitude for giving entertaining sermons caught the attention of Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr.

The second half of this book focuses on the sit ins at lunch counters and the training the participants went through to guarantee that they would keep their cool no matter how awful they were treated.

If I had read this book when it was first published, I suspect I would have read it with greater optimism. It's presented in a hopeful tone on that draws a line from the the sit-ins and the marches to Obama's presidency.

Now though with how the election has gone, I see these books more as manuals for the next generation of protestors. Things weren't perfect but now racism has an open forum and it scares me.

Five stars

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