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Comments for Book Blogger Hop for February 18, 2011

Book Blogger HopBook Blogger Hop for February 18, 2011: 02/18/11

The question this week asks us which book we'd like to see turned into a film. The answer for me is simple: Nathaniel Hawthorne's The Marble Faun.

The book is set in Rome and was set in contemporary times. So although that means horses and carriages, the book to me felt more modern than that.

If I were to adapt it to film I would set the book in the 1920s before the economic crash, before Fascism, when things were still optimistic in the rebuilding from the Great War. The main characters, young American girls, would be perfect flappers.

Regardless of what you think of Hawthorne's most famous works, you must try The Marble Faun. It is light and airy and magical.

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Comment #1: Saturday, February, 19, 2011 at 09:18:19

Somer @ A Bird's Eye Review

I will have to check this out! Thanks for stopping by my blog!



Comment #2: Sunday, February 20, 2011 at 23:13:31

Pussreboots

I hope you do. It's a lovely book.



Comment #3: Saturday, February, 19, 2011 at 09:47:27

Dee, hopping from e-Volving Books

Wow, I like how you thought of the setting of the movie!



Comment #4: Sunday, February 20, 2011 at 23:14:34

Pussreboots

The setting just fits in the 1920s even though it's set in contemporary (late 1800s) Italy.



Comment #5: Saturday, February, 19, 2011 at 12:18:30

Laura @ I'm Booking It

Thanks for hopping by my blog.

I have to admit, I've never read anything by Hawthorne, even his most well known books.



Comment #6: Sunday, February 20, 2011 at 23:16:21

Pussreboots

If you were to read one of his books, I'd pick The Marble Faun.



Comment #7: Saturday, February, 19, 2011 at 14:30:47

Diana (Book of Secrets)

Interesting choice! I'm a huge fan of The Scarlet Letter and The House of the Seven Gables, but I have not read the book you mentioned. I'll have to give it a try!



Comment #8: Sunday, February 20, 2011 at 23:16:21

Pussreboots

So am I. But The Marble Faun blew me away.



Comment #9: Saturday, February, 19, 2011 at 16:33:31

Juli @ Universe in Words

Heey
I really liked Hawthorne's The Scarlet Letter so I'll try this one!! Hop over if you have the time to see my answer!
Juli



Comment #10: Sunday, February 20, 2011 at 23:19:03

Pussreboots

I hope you do. Happy reading.



Comment #11: Saturday, February, 19, 2011 at 17:44:12

Andrea @ Reading Lark

That does sound like it would make an interesting film. Thanks for stopping by Reading Lark.



Comment #12: Sunday, February 20, 2011 at 23:21:14

Pussreboots

You're welcome. Have a great week.



Comment #13: Saturday, February, 19, 2011 at 23:16:44

Carol Arsenault

Thanks for hopping by the Paperback Princesses. I don't know this book, but it sounds interesting - I'll have to try it.



Comment #14: Sunday, February 20, 2011 at 23:22:31

Pussreboots

I hope you do. I don't know why it's been forgotten. I guess because it's a departure from the style of his most famous books. Happy reading.



Comment #15: Saturday, February, 19, 2011 at 23:17:18

кєяo

Sounds good. I like movies that are set in older times.
Thanks for stopping by my blog.

Your new follower,
kero



Comment #16: Sunday, February 20, 2011 at 23:23:31

Pussreboots

Thank you for the follow. I was entertaining out of town guests this weekend so I wasn't able to approve and respond to posts sooner.



Comment #17: Saturday, February, 19, 2011 at 23:28:21

Vicki S.

Huh, I've never heard of it. So it's mainly historical fiction? Any mystery or romance involved? Because I'm sure any studio is gonna need some sort of scandal if it's gonna make a movie set in the 20's. Well, unless it's an Indie production, but there goes the budget for costumes/props/period vehicles.



Comment #18: Sunday, February 20, 2011 at 23:25:32

Pussreboots

Studios make period pieces all the time. It wouldn't be a scandal. It's a Gothic romance, or what would now be called a paranormal romance. It's actually set in contempoary (meaning when the book was written), late 1800s, Rome, but it has a more modern feel to it. It just feels like it belongs in the 1920s. But shoot, I'd even settle for it set in present day.



Comment #19: Sunday, February, 20, 2011 at 13:41:30

Rhiannon

You're right, now I do want to read it. Thanks for stoping by!



Comment #20: Sunday, February 20, 2011 at 23:28:34

Pussreboots

Great! I hope you do. Happy reading.